3 Principles That Works in Leadership Development

We’re hearing more and more often at churches of all sizes how difficult it is for pastors to develop leaders.

You find yourself doing all the leading, and at the same time, feeling ineffective because you know you need to be raising up more leaders to give ministry away.

Can you relate?

leader development

We’re fortunate to have a lot of opportunities to be on the ground with churches. We see so many struggle to connect people with Jesus beyond the Sunday services.

As I’ve written about before, for people with a leadership gifting, developing that gift is part of their experience of discipleship.

I’m reminded of a podcast conversation I had a while back, with Reggie Campbell, founder of Radical Mentoring, and Clay Scroggins, who is helping implement this strategy at North Point Community Church. They shared a few insights about how to make developing more leaders practical, specifically by spending more time with fewer people.

Here are the highlights:

  1. Invest in People Who Will Pay It Forward

Investing in people who want to grow in their relationship with Jesus is a win; however, we aim to develop leaders so they, in turn, will go develop more leaders. You get a greater return on your investment of time when you identify people with leadership potential and help them take their next steps.

Investing in people who want to grow in their relationship with Jesus is a win; however, we aim to develop leaders so they, in turn, will go develop more leaders. Click To Tweet
  1. Mentor in Groups

There is only one of you, and leading many people one on one requires an abundance of time (something we’re already lacking). Hosting groups, versus individual mentorship (which also has its place), not only creates more time, but also a sense of community.

It creates a sense of belonging and builds community. We’ve seen that investing more time in fewer people has the domino effect. Instead of spreading a little to many, you can add depth and give a lot to few.

We’ve seen that investing more time in fewer people has the domino effect. Instead of spreading a little to many, you can add depth and give a lot to few. Click To Tweet
  1. Create a Standard of Commitment

Establishing a system of commitment creates a standard of accountability. Without the commitment to becoming a disciple, and ultimately becoming a disciple maker, the investment can lose its impact. Commitment breeds motivated leaders, and motivated leaders breed more disciples.

The conversation with Reggie and Clay goes much deeper. Take a listen. You can do so here, on The Unstuck Church Podcast.

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