paulalexander

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About Paul Alexander

Paul is a Ministry Consultant with The Unstuck Group. Paul has more than 20 years experience serving in the local church, the last 15 of which have been on the Sr. Leadership Teams of some of the nation’s leading mega-churches. Currently, Paul is serving as the Executive Pastor at Sun Valley Community Church, a large multi-site church located in the Phoenix area.

6 Keys to Motivating Millennial Leaders

If you have any millennials on your church staff, you know that they’re different. And while many traditional church leaders are quick to equate a different approach with a wrong approach, wise leaders know that different just means, well, different. In fact, different could even mean better.

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By |2018-04-27T15:27:56-04:00March 28th, 2018|Leadership|1 Comment

8 Red Flags for Ministry Staff Recruiting

As staff recruiting in the ministry world continues to evolve and become more competitive and sophisticated, churches and recruiting firms have developed a keen sense of red flags during the recruiting process that help indicate whether a candidate is a good fit for your church or not. Those red flags may be a bit different from church to church, but there are many red flags that are fairly consistent across the board.

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By |2018-01-26T08:56:16-04:00January 24th, 2018|Staffing|1 Comment

10 Keys to Leading Change in a Church

Leading through change can be difficult. Leading a church through change can seem impossible. Churches in particular have a tendency to resist change because they get trapped by the comfort of past success, practices and traditions. It takes an incredible amount of wisdom, the art of timing, and plain old courage and grit.

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By |2017-08-06T16:45:45-04:00August 9th, 2017|Leadership|1 Comment

What to Do When You Find Yourself Doing Everything

Have you ever felt like you were working as hard as you possibly could and still at the end of the day were left with a pile of work that didn’t get done?

Ever feel like everyone was coming to you for you to weigh in on every decision that needed to be made? Ever feel like what you thought was just going to be a busy season has turned into a normal way of work?

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By |2017-05-02T11:13:56-04:00May 3rd, 2017|Leadership|0 Comments

When Is the Right Time To Restructure Your Church Staff?

One of the most common lids to growth in a church is structure. It can free you up to move toward the vision that God has given your church or it can chain you to the past. Either way, it’s your choice. But how do you know if a restructure is in your future? These helpful tips below will help you get going in the right direction.

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By |2017-02-09T13:52:23-04:00September 20th, 2016|Staffing|1 Comment

Why the Key to Flexibility In Leadership Is Planning

A good plan that can’t be changed is a bad plan. If you’re inflexible you’re going to find executing a plan to be nearly impossible. No matter how much preparation you put into it there are still going to be unforeseen obstacles. You may find you have the wrong leader executing the plan. You may have underestimated the resources required to execute the plan. Or you may overestimate the pace at which the plan can be properly executed.

But make no mistake about it; planning is the key to flexibility in leadership.

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By |2017-08-06T18:45:35-04:00August 6th, 2016|Leadership|1 Comment

Is Your Church Like Walmart?

Walmart, with all of it’s success as a company, has continued to come under public criticism in recent years. A quick Google Search will provide a litany of articles about the company devaluing employees in order to pad bottom lines and the big box store “gobbling up” smaller local retailers when they move into a new community.

It seems like every town in America has a Walmart. But with all of their expansion and financial success is Walmart headed in the right direction?

I recently read an article in Forbes that suggested despite all of their success, the future looks bleak for Walmart.

Past wins don’t necessitate future success.

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By |2017-02-09T13:52:24-04:00May 21st, 2016|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Church Merger Deal Breakers

10 Areas of Ministry to Get on the Same Page Before You Merge

Church mergers are becoming more commonplace, and for a lot of reasons it’s a movement that I believe we’ll see more of in the future. In fact Sun Valley Community Church, the church I have the pleasure of serving at, has experienced beginning two new campuses through mergers in the last couple of years.

There are a lot of things that can go right…and wrong…in a church merger. But if your church is considering a merger in the future make sure the Senior Leadership Teams from both churches consider and discuss the following 10 potential deal breakers, and get on the same page before bringing the idea to your individual churches.

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By |2019-04-02T14:53:55-04:00May 14th, 2016|Strategy|0 Comments

5 Keys To Developing Young Leaders In Your Church

It seems like everywhere you turn lately some national church leader is writing about the bleak future of the U.S. Church due to younger generations leaving. Well, recently I spent some time at a place that made me really hopeful about the future of the church in America.

This past weekend I had the opportunity to do some coaching at Ethos Church, a young multisite church located in Nashville, Tennessee. In just seven years, Ethos has grown to three locations and more than 2,500 people in attendance, and the rate at which they are baptizing people is in the top 10% of churches in the U.S.! Plainly stated, God is using the ministry of Ethos Church to change people’s lives. But what excited me the most about my time with them was everywhere I looked there were young leaders, and not just serving as interns or in some inconsequential role. But there were young men and women in their 20’s and 30’s (the ones in their 30’s were the old ones…I guess that makes me ancient now) who are serving as the senior leaders of this fast growing church.

In working with churches around the country, unfortunately churches like Ethos have become the exception rather than the rule. It doesn’t have to be that way. This list below of 5 Things Young Leaders Need is a great place for your church start.

1. Opportunity

Even leaders who have been gifted greatly don’t start out as great leaders. Someone somewhere gave them their first opportunity. The tough thing about leadership is that it isn’t learned in a classroom; it’s learned by leading. In order to grow and develop, young leaders need the opportunity to get real hands on experience.

Question: Does your church give young leaders real opportunities to lead stuff that matters?

2. Access

Young leaders need access to real leadership conversations. They need to be a “fly on the wall” in board meetings, management team meetings, and executive team meetings. They need to watch the senior leaders in the organization lead through the tough stuff and make the big decisions. They need access to ask experienced leaders questions about how they lead and why they do it the way they do.

Question: Do the senior leaders in your church give young leaders unfiltered access to watch real leadership take place and discuss it?

3. Authority

Young leaders don’t just need busy work to keep them occupied. Once they’ve proven they can deliver through following through on tasks being delegated to them they need to be empowered to make real decisions and exercise real authority to accomplish objectives through leading their own teams and delegating to others.

Question: Does your church give young leaders real consequential responsibility?

4. Grace

Part of the nature of being a young leader is making mistakes. Even experienced leaders don’t get it right all the time; and young inexperienced leaders certainly are going to make mistakes, it’s the nature of young leaders. How you respond when young leaders fail matters.

Question: Does your church give young leaders the room to fail?

5. Coaching

Great coaching can make all the difference in the performance of a team or a particular player. Great coaches do four simple things with their players.

They train their players before the game.

They put their players in game-like situations in practice and get “reps” in before the real game happens.

They make in-game adjustments.

They watch the game film after the game to review and learn from the player’s performance.

Question: Does your church expect young leaders to learn on their own through their own experience or do you actually coach them?

 

By |2017-02-09T13:52:30-04:00December 23rd, 2015|Leadership|0 Comments